MacWorld

Still using Apple’s Aperture? Your time is running out

3 months 2 weeks ago

Five years ago, Apple stopped development on Aperture and iPhoto, two apps made for photo management, the former being the professional app and the latter the app for general consumers. Apple replaced those apps with Photos, but you could still run the older apps, and Aperture users were more likely to stick with Aperture.

However, Apple recently announced that Aperture, a 32-bit app, will not work in future versions of macOS, which will eventually support only 64-bit apps. If you’ve been holding out, you have to make one of the following choices:

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Roman Loyola

These ambient smart bulbs from LiFX and TP-Link are just $15 each today

3 months 2 weeks ago

Smart bulbs are a great way to get started on a connected home, but at upwards of $50 a pop, they're not exactly cheap. Today we have two solid smart bulb options that are: A two-pack of TP-Link's KL120 Kasa smart bulbs is $30 from B&H PhotoRemove non-product link, down from a list price of $50, and a four-pack of the LIFX Mini Day and Dusk smart bulbs is $61 from AmazonRemove non-product link, a $50 savings a new all-time low.

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Alexandria Haslam

Anki is shutting down, but its adorable Cozmo and Vector robots deserve a new home

3 months 2 weeks ago

RIP Cozmo and Vector. According to a report from Recode, Anki, the company responsible for making small AI-tuned robots with giant personalities is shutting down after it ran out of money. Recode says the company is forced to close its doors “after a new round of financing fell through at the last minute.”

For anyone who ponied up a couple hundred bucks to buy one of Anki’s robots, it’s a bummer. While the company confirmed its closure to Crunchbase, it hasn’t said how it will handle support for existing models, and the news will surely affect future development of the platform.

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Michael Simon

These $200 Noise-Cancelling Headphones Are Just $50 Today

3 months 2 weeks ago

If you fly often or take a noisy train to work everyday, you probably own a set of decent headphones to drown out unnecessary noise. However, regular headphones don’t do an adequate job of blocking outside noises, so you might be turning up your volume louder than necessary just to shut them out. You can protect your ears more effectively by investing in noise cancelling headphones like these $49.99 1Voice AXRs.

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DealPost Team

I d.o.! How to solve the I d.o.n.t. autocorrect problem in iOS

3 months 2 weeks ago

Two weeks ago, I wrote about the “I d.o.n.t.” autocorrect mystery that a Macworld reader was having with their iPhone. Tapping in “I don’t” resulted in “I D.o.n.t.” They had no idea why, and nothing they tried worked.

Since that column appeared, a couple dozens readers have shared that they see the same correction and haven’t been able to retrain their iOS device to get rid of it. One person added a correction in Settings > General > Keyboard > Text Replacement and added “dont” as a shortcut that changed to “don’t”—that’s right, they have to make a typo to get the correct text to appear.

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Glenn Fleishman

How to stop your iPhone videos from turning into a blurry mess on Android phones (and vice versa)

3 months 2 weeks ago

Sadly, our friends don’t all have iPhones. That means some of our Message chats are peppered with green bubbles and send over regular SMS instead of via Apple’s ultra-fast iMessage system. But it’s not just the color and speed that makes iMessage superior: it’s also the clarity and downright watchability when dealing with videos.

If you thought the latest Game of Thrones episode was hard to see, clearly you’ve never sent a video from Messages on your iPhone to a friend with an Android phone. If they responded with something like, “What is this?!”, it probably wasn’t because of the content—it’s because they could barely see what was going on in the clip. By the time it reached their device, the video is a blurry, garbled mess. That carefully edited HD clip you took on your new iPhone was reduced to an unwatchable sludge once it reached your friend’s phone. And the same is true of the videos they send you.

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Michael Simon

Simple motives: Guessing why Apple does things

3 months 2 weeks ago

Have you taken Apple Uproar 101? Well, if not, here’s the notes from the syllabus: When someone complains about Apple, type it up.

That’s pretty much it. It’s a short course. Usually a J-term class.

Writing for The New York Times, Jack Nicas claims “Apple Cracks Down on Apps That Fight iPhone Addiction.”

Over the past year, Apple has removed or restricted at least 11 of the 17 most downloaded screen-time and parental-control apps, according to an analysis by The New York Times and Sensor Tower, an app-data firm.

Why would Apple do that? Well, surely because it wants your kids to use their iPhones more, that’s why! When you don’t look into it and take the word of the companies that make these apps at face value, there’s literally no other way to see it.

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The Macalope
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